We are an online artist community sharing ways to create and sell art. Join us to save big on art supplies or try our easy websites for artists.

Do you ever feel stuck for ways to blog, post, tweet, and share about your art? If so, keep reading, because today I’m going to break down 50 different ways to talk about your art and connect with potential (and current) collectors:

1. Ask your audience for feedback—Is it finished?

2. Ask your audience to vote on a title for your latest piece.

3. Share secrets about your process.

4. Show your work in progress.

5. Ask your audience for color input.

6. Get presentation feedback: ask your audience to vote on how you display your art.

7. Guest post for blogs that have a similar audience.

8. Guest post for a large platform like Tiny Buddha, Huffington Post, etc.

9. Gift your art to influencers. Ask yourself, are there people who might enjoy your work and possibly share it with others? There should be no demand or expectation on your side—make a gift of your artwork because it feels good.

10. Make art inspired by influencers. Create work that continues the story someone has shared about their life. Then, talk about it.

11. Do a Facebook Live Q & A. Announce a specific date for a LIVE Q&A, and have a list of questions ready to answer.

12. Create an in-depth tutorial about your process.

13. Show close up detail of your work and have your audience guess what it is.

14. Ask your audience about your latest composition.

15. Ask your audience—How does my work make you feel?

16. Ask your audience—What 3 words come to mind when you look at my art?

17. Photograph your workspace.

18. Photograph yourself working.

19. Take a video of yourself working.

20. Create a speed videos of your process, from start to finish.

21. Call collectors and ask about your art. How is it? Are there any issues?

22. Collect testimonials about your art.

23. Offer advice on caring for your artwork.

24. Share how best to hang and display art in your home.

25. Offer interior decorating advice.

26. Partner with an interior designer. Introduce yourself (and your work) to designers who have a similar aesthetic to build greater access to collectors.

27. Consign art to a local gallery or coffee shop.

28. Offer talks at a community center about your art.

29. Create and offer workshops to pass along your unique artistic skills.

30. Share the story/inspiration behind your art.

31. Write an ebook about yourself and your art.

32. Send upcoming exhibition notices to past collectors of your work.

33. Contact past collectors to offer them a “first view.” It’s always a nice touch to share new work first with the people who have already collected your art.

34. Present new art in batches. Don’t just make a single piece and share it; instead, create a series of work and then be strategic with how you present it in order to generate more interest in each successive piece.

35. Go to your local TV or radio station and pitch a story about your art.

36. Hold your own abandoned art project. Leave your card with your art.

37. Pitch a local newspaper about your art.

38. Find current writers for Huffington Post or similar large sites and pitch being featured in a story.

39. Find a magazine that sells your materials or uses your medium or style, and pitch them a story of your art.

40. Find out which words are used to describe your art by people who enjoy it. Then add that list of words to your SEO (search engine optimization) efforts.

41. What stores/brands/magazines align with your type of artwork? Develop a partnership with them.

42. Use just one specific art supply brand when creating your next artwork, and tell that company about it. Pitch it as a story for the brand—share your end result, and how you worked with their supplies.

43. Send a yearly note of thanks to your past collectors.

44. Survey your collectors about packaging, timely shipping, checkout process, etc, and see where you can improve.

45. Share problems you’ve experienced and how you solve them.

46. Be vulnerable about your process and your life as an artist.

47. Tell the story of a particular series of artwork over a period of time. Break the story into “chapters” to build interest in the series overall.

48. Host a local ART meetup.

49. Try out a variety of media—write, photograph, record, speak in person, etc.

50. Maintain an email newsletter list and ask people to sign up.

Ultimately, it’s important that you spend quality time with people who might like your art. You need to share, open up, and take initiative to promote your art if you want to connect with people who might buy it.

I encourage you to use any or all of these ideas above. . . the most important thing is to simply start sharing!

Special thanks to Carrie Brummer, artist, educator, entrepreneur and founder of www.ArtistStrong.com. Join her free 10-day art challenge and start cultivating your creativity today!

*Note: this post may contain affiliate links*

Let’s talk about two simple facts about marketing.

• Marketing is necessary (yes, even for artists) • Anyone can be a marketer

I’m an artist myself and I happen to look at marketing as a necessary nuisance. Most artists would probably agree with me. But let's take a few minutes to determine whether or not each of those statements are true.

1.. . . read more

If you're looking for something else. . .
Love the Easel?

Subscribe to our totally free weekly newsletter for artists. Sign up today!

EE Writers
Cassie Rief Niki Hilsabeck Lisa Orgler Carrie Lewis Aletta de Wal Phawnda Moore

If you'd like to write for EmptyEasel, let us know!

We love publishing reader-submitted art tutorials, stories, and even reviews.Submit yours here!
© 2006-2017 EmptyEasel.com About Contact Sitemap Privacy Policy Terms of Use Advertise