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5 Ways to Help Your Art Blog get more “Shares” and “Likes”

Art blogs are nothing like regular blogs—they usually serve different ends and attract a different kind of audience. For any artist willing to embrace the digital world, a blog can be a great promotion medium. For example, gaining popularity through dozens of comments and shares can boost your chances at being included in an art show, or the likelihood of your art being purchased as a part of a collection.

Here are some practical tips on how to help your content get “shared” and “liked” more often:

1. Make it visual

In the world of blogging, visuals are key to success—even more so, if the blog in question is an actual creative gem. And keep in mind, just because you’re an artist doesn’t mean that you should only use your artwork on your blog. When it comes to blog posts, a catchy image can be a deal-breaker.

There are lots of amazing pictures out there just waiting to be used on your blog—check some of the free stock image services like freerangestock.com, freeimages.com or Flickr (try the Free Use group).

2. Promote your work

Like any other blog, an artist’s blog has its down-to-earth side too—it’s there to promote your art. Just make sure that the quality of your content, images or audio files is top-notch. You don’t want to discourage a potential collector or sponsor by including representations of your artwork that don’t reflect the excellent craftsmanship behind them.

The presentation of your work online should be just as passionate as you are in person—use your voice to back up your brand and extend your artistic presence. Spread your voice to other platforms like social media or web forums and spark a conversation with other artist-bloggers.

3. Expose yourself

If you think people are reading your blog exclusively because of your art, you’re kidding yourself. This might go against the grain, but the main attraction on your blog is you—as a person and as an artist. Be authentic and don’t shy away from exposing parts of your life that you think are public enough.

Try doing some “behind the scenes” posts. . . showing photos of your creative process will build a sense of intimacy and reveal the human face behind your artwork. If your work involves amazing locations, your readers will be more than happy to sneak a peek at your daily life.

4. Engage people

Even though it’s your art blog, you’ll still need to talk about something more than just your work. Blogs are all about human engagement, emotions, and connection. Show a different side of you on your blog—have the courage to speak your mind, share stories from your life and travels, expose some hilarious facts about yourself and reveal what inspired you to take this picture or write that song.

5. Learn from the pros

When blogging, always look up to those who’ve made it—some of the most notable examples of artists-bloggers include Austin Kleon, Ed Terpening, Amanda Palmer or Chase Jarvis. As you visit and study their blogs, you’ll notice that all those figures create completely different forms of art, yet all of them recognized the potential behind online promotion and are now prospering thanks to their vibrant and fascinating personalities they share while blogging.

Kelly Smith works at CourseFinder.com.au, an Australian online courses resource, and writes about online marketing and the Australian blogosphere.

*Note: this post may contain affiliate links*

I have always felt that if artists could work together (and a few do) we would be able to accomplish almost anything. So I started looking at some problems we face. The main problem we deal with is one of exposure. If the public can't view our work, how can we sell? There are just too few galleries still functioning across the country in this miserable recession. And many artists are too old,. . . read more

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