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An Interview With Abstract Painter, Destiny Womack

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Shortly after becoming a stay-at-home wife, Destiny Womack decided to list a few of her paintings on eBay in hopes of earning enough money to buy more paints and canvases.

To her surprise, they sold within just a few hours and as quickly as that, her new career as an abstract artist was launched.

Though she never majored in art, Destiny’s business background has helped keep her small business profitable and growing while she formulated her unique, abstract style.

Alyice: For those who have a hard time understanding abstract art, what is it?

Destiny: For me abstract art is a way of taking what I feel, or see in my mind and my imagination, and putting onto a surface for others to get a glimpse of. The neat thing about abstract art is that many people will see different things as their imagination takes them to other places.

Alyice: Why did you choose abstract as your creative style of choice?

Destiny: I didn’t really choose it, I say it chose me. I feel like my imagination was so large and emotions so strong that I couldn’t fit my feelings into a subject so I ran wild with them.

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Alyice: How has your style changed over the years?

Destiny: When I first started painting it was very timid expressions, you could literally see that I was holding back, but when I let go that is when the best came out.

I often look back at photos of my early work and I am amazed to see how over time I became more free with my expressions. I would love to one day incorporate actual figures into my work instead of just representations of them, and I imagine that over time as I continue to stretch my artistic muscle I will get there.

Alyice: Since abstract art is non-representational (without recognizable shapes or figures), how do you find your inspiration?

Destiny: I am very inspired by my emotions. My collectors have learned to see that when I am feeling certain things I paint in certain ways, so my biggest inspiration is the normal motion of life and the emotions I get from that.

I have a beautiful family that inspires me everyday. I am also very into nature and music and highly inspired by it. To me, I see a variety of colors associated with every emotion I feel, every crescendo in music, and every breeze in the wind, and I try to incorporate what I see in my mind into my work.

Alyice: What is your creative process like?

Destiny: I paint every day, and try to learn something new, or push myself a little farther each day.

I chose paint because it just felt right. I also dabbl in other materials, and have been known to mix medias to come to an end result.

I sometimes do studies if there is something I want to try, but usually I just go full on into a project and see where it takes me. I have been known to splash, drip, pour, apply with unusual instruments, or use only my hands to complete a painting at the end of a paint day I am covered in paint. I sometimes take only minutes to create a painting and other times it can take days.

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Alyice: Abstract art evokes a lot of emotions through color and composition. Can you tell us how you use color and composition to evoke emotion in your pieces?

Destiny: For me as an artist, I simply love color. Every color is used for different reasons and tied to different emotions. I try to use colors in my work to express my feelings and I use colors specifically that will sooth, calm, excite, and inspire.

I want my works to take the viewer on a journey through their own imagination and stimulate their own emotion. I have hopes when I create each piece that It will hit the person it is meant to be with and leave them speechless because they have connected to it.

Alyice: What is the most challenging part about creating abstract art?

Destiny: For me, I don’t have many challenges when creating the art. But I do have some challenges explaining it to people who simply do not understand abstract.

Alyice: What do you wish you knew about painting abstracts before you got started?

Destiny: How addicting my work would be. I sometimes wake in the middle of the night filled with inspiration and the need to paint

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Alyice: What has been your greatest difficulty as an abstract artist and how did you overcome it?

Destiny: So far my greatest difficulty has been learning to not let the ups and downs of the business aspect of my art effect my confidence in my work.

It is very hard when sales get low, or the economy is slow, to not think to yourself that your work is not good. It is also very challenging being a self-representing artist. But once you pass those hurdles and remain confident in yourself as an artist then it all starts getting a little easier.

Alyice: How do you come up with a profitable pricing structure for your abstract pieces?

Destiny: This one was hard for me. I try to do what I think is easy for everyone to afford my work.

Every artist wants to be successful and make a decent living, but every artist also wants their work to be shared, If I could paint and share my work without having to sell it but still be able to take care of my family that would be ideal, but in the end the bills have to be paid.

I want everyone, from people in small apartments to the big corporate offices, to be able to own one my pieces so I base my price structure in that way.

You can learn more about Destiny Womack’s art at www.destinywomack.com.

*Note: this post may contain affiliate links*

Suzanne Millius was exposed to a very creative lifestyle as a young child. Her parents introduced her to both music and art, but it was art that captured her heart.

Suzanne was obsessed with creating, and over the years she realized that art. . . read more

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