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Inspiration is Everywhere! Just Take a Look Around. . .

As artists, we often run into obstacles that hinder our creativity. Maybe it’s just a small worry that sucks some of the life out of your work. Or maybe it’s something bigger that stops you in your tracks for days or weeks.

It can be understandably hard to find inspiration at these times. You might feel that your creative juices have dried up or that you have no more to give to the world.

But. . . those feelings aren’t reality. Inspiration is everywhere! Here are four ways to get past those worries and into new realms of creativity!

lilypond

Step 1. Take a break

You heard me. Stop forcing it! Straining to push those creative juices out makes Jane or Joe Artist a very unhappy person. It can adversely affect your health and well-being. You also risk burn-out.

A break can be small. You can go for a walk, or a drive to some place you’ve been longing to go. You can choose a piece of music that is different or stroll into a local art gallery. The possibilities are endless. In fact, you don’t need to get too detailed here. You just need to be open to the world around you.

Sometimes it helps to daydream about what you might want to do. Or, allow yourself to research questions and explore areas you’ve always wanted to delve into.

You may be pleasantly surprised at how you feel when you return from your time away.

Step 2. Find a new niche

Sometimes just taking a break just doesn’t cut it. Every artist goes through dry spells, and young and old alike need brainstorming sessions to generate new ideas. It is important, then, to pick yourself up and look for your inspiration in a new realm.

For example, you might decide to change up what stimuli you use to create your creativity.

daedala

Nicole Alger (the artist whose paintings inspired this article) changed her outlook and her focus recently from the realist paintings she’s been known for to imaginative, narrative work. Her new pieces show a reawakening of passions that resonate with many who need a change of perspective.

Step 3. Break the chains of habit

It may be hard to break those chains. You know the ones. It is very easy to form routines that make you feel comfortable, but it’s not so easy to break the habits that result from these routines.

Creativity stoking sessions can be one way to get past those routines. These sessions may consist of doodling or drawing, forming collages, or any number of creative exercises.

Step 4. Become the person you were meant to be

Everyone takes their inspiration from different sources. There is no wrong way to seek inspiration.

For instance, you might gain your inspiration from the way light reflects on objects. The texture and flow of light, the patterns light creates, it can all provide different perspectives on objects and places.

Whatever inspires you, it is important to understand what drives your creative energies. And don’t limit that! Maybe you enjoy photography and draw inspiration from underwater scenes. Perhaps you’re drawn to impressionist painting that seems to dance off the canvas.

bigtree

Nicole Alger has created beautiful landscape drawings that reflect the landscape in a reflective way. Taking a much needed break has helped energize her paintings. Her artwork is a good example of what can be accomplished when you decide to change direction.

So take care of yourself. It’s important that you don’t burn out in pursuit of creativity! If nothing else, remember that inspiration can be found everywhere you look.

Special thanks to Justin Preston and Nicole Alger for contributing this post!

*Note: this post may contain affiliate links*

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Some time ago, I wrote about experiencing disappointments in the studio and in life in general. At the time, I referenced a prestigious juried exhibit to. . . read more

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