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A Social Media Gameplan for Artists (In just 15 Minutes a Day)

When it comes to adding one MORE thing to your already busy task list, social networking may seem like it’s just not worth it. (Plus, it can feel pretty daunting when you consider all the options and possibilities involved.)

But what if I told you that you can set up and maintain a social media campaign in just 15 minutes a day?

Below is a four step plan to help you stay focused and get the most out of your social media campaign—without wearing you out or wasting hours of your time.

1. Create a weekly plan of action

One of the ways you can get more work done in less time is to create an action plan, then stick to it.

Business hypnotherapist and success coach, Jenn August, suggests creating an editorial schedule to help you stay on track. This calendar should include mentions of your upcoming events and programs as well as a “list of thoughts, quotes, and tips” that relate to your business and/or your target audience.

Jenn explains, “I prepare a list of topics that I would like to share with my contacts for the coming week. I usually prepare them on Friday night. Then all I have to do is post one of my prepared topics … [I] use of the rest of my 15 minute time frame to develop rapport and socialize with my social media contacts.”

Gina D. Carr, MBA adds this tip: “Be very strategic and focused in your activity. Write it down on paper and put it in front of you when you get on the computer. Make sure that you do not waver from that objective until it is complete.”

2. Choose one social media network only

With only 15 minutes to engage with fans, you can’t be on every social network known to man, so choose a network that fits the goals for your business, and your natural ability to network.

Creative Principal and Content Strategist, Valerie McKeehan says, “A lot of people are under the mentality that they need to be everywhere, but the problem with this thinking is that business owners get overwhelmed and end up doing a lack luster job on every portal.”

Instead of over-committing yourself, Valerie says to “do your research on your core customer and audience as well as your type of business.”

“If you sell a product or service to other businesses, for example, LinkedIn might be the choice for you. If, on the other hand, your business is extremely visual in nature, Pinterest would be the best option. If you focus your time on just one social network you will be able to do a better job with less time.”

3. Create one strong post per day

If your time is really limited, don’t think you have to post every four hours as suggested by social media experts. Instead, concentrate on providing one key post; a post that gets your message across and engages your fans at the same time.

Media Relations Specialist, Jerian DiMattei feels it’s in your best interest to “focus on one strong post or tweet for the day, then use the rest of your time to create strong and lasting relationships with existing and new followers.”

He goes on to say that when you’re thinking about that strong post, “consider something that promotes consumer interaction” instead of just posting a blog update or product announcement.

4. Make it a priority to engage with your followers

The key to any good social media campaign is the interaction you have with your fans, the more engaged they are, the more likely they are to share news about you with others.

With that in mind, Justice of the Peace, Ernest Adams says social media is less about selling and more about sharing. “90% of your posts should be focused on non-sales, with only 10% focused on selling your product.”

And there you have it. . . the next time you feel overwhelmed, just stop and think about these four basic steps. Reduce what you’re doing down to these basics, and your social media work will suddenly be a lot more manageable.

*Note: this post may contain affiliate links*

Everyone loves a party, but a party hosted by an artist where you're surrounded by fabulous art and delicious snacks sounds extrafun.

Hosting your own open studio event can be a fun and inexpensive way of selling a lot of art, as well as getting people from your local community interested in what you do. If you have a home studio large enough to host a few people, you could. . . read more

If you're looking for something else. . .
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